Plan your days Norfolk Style

New daily planners for 2023 have just been released in my Amazon store.

Norfolk scenes feature on the covers so you can enjoy your favourite Norfolk view every day. The current collection includes: Wells-next-the-sea, Stiffkey, Winterton-on-sea, Cromer, Salthouse and Blakeney. There are also Norfolk seals, and the beautiful and rare Swallowtail butterfly to enjoy.

Inside are 365 pages ready for you to fill in your daily schedule and priorities. Note important meetings or dates. Journal your water intake and what you eat. A handy way to note your moods and feelings too, what you are excited or grateful for. Keep an eye on the weather too.

The softback cover and internal pages are very tactile and the size (8.5x 11″) practical.

Ideal for personal or work use.

Perfect gift for anyone who loves Norfolk or go ahead and treat yourself. Click on the images below to buy. The link will take you to my Amazon store.

More books are on the way so please subscribe to see new notebooks, journals and planners as they arrive.

Fye Bridge

On a blissful summer’s evening walk along the River Wensum a couple of weeks ago, we came across one of the city’s ghostly storytellers regaling a sizeable group with tales of the women suspected of being witches who were ducked and drowned from Fye Bridge.

Matthew Hopkins, the Witchfinder General, and his colleague in terror, John Stearne, carried out the witch hunts between 1644 and 1647. You can read more about their evil endeavours at CulturaObscura.


The bridge itself looks innocently picturesque in the balmy evening light, but once it held nothing but terror for some of the folk of Norwich, mostly women, but also dishonest tradesmen. 


Fye Bridge is the oldest known bridge site in Norwich. Even older than Bishop Bridge, the bridge was rebuilt in the early 1930’s, so it has a more modern appearance. The bridge site dates back to 1153, a timber structure replaced with stone in the early 15th century. You can see more details and images of the construction of Fye Bridge via George Plunkett.

Personally, I love the shape of Fye bridge, the low curves and contrasting brickwork. It’s nice to sit with a drink at the Ribs of Beef and watch river life glide by.

Fye Bridge shot from a Thorpe Island Canoe

Sometimes you can see Kingfishers doing a spot of fishing. I’ve heard otters are sometimes around, but we have yet to see one.

Fye Bridge Quayside viewpoint


As with many old sites in Norwich, there are stories of a ghost. I will return to ghostly goings on in more detail as this Wensum series progresses, but the likelihood of me ever catching one on camera is extremely remote. If I ever do, the images will appear here first!

From NorfolkLive.co.uk—”Fye Bridge still stands today, and although the days of dunking suspected witches into the river are over, the bridge is said to be home to the ghost of a woman who was tried at the site. She was later burned for witchcraft at the nearby Lollard’s Pit, which is now a local pub. According to those who have had sightings of the ghost, she is dressed in rags and begs strangers to help her pick up a dropped bundle of sticks that were used to kindle the fire that killed her. It’s also believed that those that are kind enough to stop and help her will die in a fire within the year. “

It is always in my nature to help where needed, but I may avoid helping this ghost, I’ve far too many blog posts to get done yet!

Fye Bridge Willows

The name Fye, comes from Magdalen Street which was originally called Fybriggate meaning the street leading to Fye Bridge. (Heritage Norfolk). 

Please visit the sites I have linked for more information. I find the George Plunkett site particularly fascinating because of the old images of the bridges along the Wensum. It is well worth a look.

Under Fye Bridge

If you are interested to learn more of the history of old Norwich, the sites mentioned above give great information. Nick Stone of Invisible Works also makes for a fascinating and in depth read.

If you are new to Norwich I hope you will enjoy learning more about this fine city with its incredible history. If you already have lived here for years, I am sure like me, you are always learning new things about this remarkable place. Hopefully my River Wensum series will spark more interest and you will enjoy my images.

Please follow me on Twitter and Instagram and subscribe below to be kept up to date with what’s new here.

Please see other posts in the River Wensum Series below. It begins with the bridges, and I will go on to write about the buildings and wildlife (including some of the humans) along the river.

Images of Bridges along the Wensum by MyriadLifePhoto

Please scroll down to find links to the other River Wensum bridges in this series.

Carrow Bridge

Novi Sad Friendship Bridge

Lady Julian Bridge

Foundry Bridge

Bishop Bridge

Jarrold Bridge

Whitefriars Bridge

Norfolk Picture Boards – a great way to hang art!

Norfolk prints – picture boards, hang using command strips or stand on a shelf.

Picture boards are a great, affordable way to hang collections of art. I have been using Photo4Me as a print on demand service for many years, they deliver great quality. Please visit my full gallery there for prints in a wide variety of formats and sizes inc canvas, frames, acrylic, and poster prints. Keep scrolling to see more information…

Blakeney creek

Each picture board comes with free M3 command strips.

Two sizes available: 420 x 297mm or 594 x 420mm.

  • Printed using state of the art print uV™ print technology.
  • Brilliantly rich colours & razor sharp detail
  • Printed to the edge of a 5mm deep Foamex™ picture board

You can hang or stand the picture boards up.

  • Simple to hang in seconds with command strips
  • An affordable format for collections of pictures
  • Rigid and hard wearing, Foamex™ is extremely lightweight so it is ideal for many settings
  • 100% weatherproof, and unaffected by changes in weather temperature

Delivery

Your Picture Board will be delivered within a secure courier bag and comfortably bubble wrapped for protection.

Free UK delivery and Free delivery returns. See more about delivery times here

Please scroll down to see a selection of picture boards available but see the full collection here.

To get regular updates on what is new, please subscribe.

Coastal

Norwich City

River Wensum

Coastal and Norfolk Broads Boats

Black and White

Elm Hill at Night Norwich Cathedral at Night

Sailing on the Bure

See my full gallery of picture boards here

Please subscribe for regular updates.

Jarrold Bridge

Jarrold Bridge, Norwich. A photographic series of the River Wensum.

Canoeing with Thorpe Island Boats under the Jarrold Bridge

My River Wensum series starts with a photo tour of the bridges that cross it. I began with Carrow Bridge as it is the nearest to my apartment. Traveling along the Wensum up towards the city, the next bridge featured in this series is the Novi Sad Friendship Bridge, followed by the Lady Julian Bridge, and from there we arrived at the Foundry Bridge. If you were travelling towards the city by boat, to your left you would see Pull’s Ferry and Norwich Cathedral as you headed towards Bishop Bridge. The next curve is around the bend next to Cow Tower, with the Cathedral to the left, and apartments and offices to the right, where the next bridge is the Jarrold Bridge. 

The Jarrold Bridge

Back from ancient to modern again. Let no one say the Wensum doesn’t provide variety! 

The Jarrold bridge was designed by Stephen James of Ramboll (a company with 50 years of experience in bridge building) and built by local company R G Carter. Visit the Jarrold site to see all the awards this bridge has won and been short listed for. Truly impressive! You will also see other interesting facts there, such as the fact that the bridge slope is less than 1 in 20 for ease of use. It’s certainly nice to cycle over. If you are a bridge enthusiast and would like to know more about the construction of the Jarrold Bridge, SHStructures gives more technical information. I will tell you, however, it is just over 80m in length. I have never seen another bridge like it. I love the modern, clean curve of it and the location is perfect. 

Curve of the Jarrold Bridge over the Wensum
View to the Jarrold Bridge from the Wensum

From the top of the bridge you can enjoy the very natural view up towards Cow Tower and Mousehold Heath, lushly green with willows grazing the water. The bridge is just next to a car park, on the other side of which is the Adam & Eve pub, the oldest watering hole in Norwich. 

The view towards Jarrold Bridge in spring

The city view gives you the rear side of St James Mill, where Jarrold & Sons Ltd have their offices. Next door to St James Mill, new apartments are being built, so it is currently a construction site with a huge crane. I will return to St James Mill and the buildings along the Wensum in future posts. 

St James Mill where Jarrold have their offices.
View to the Jarrold Bridge in spring

The image above shows the ancient flint arch next to the ultra modern Jarrold Bridge.

From modern back to ancient, Whitefriar’s Bridge is the next bridge in this River Wensum series, which will feature not only bridges but go on to study the architecture, wildlife, and the current human life along the river. While the Wensum has a great history, life along the river continues to evolve and change, and I will be documenting that as the series continues.

Please subscribe to enjoy updates. 

Drama in the skies!

Black and white images of the north Norfolk coast.

There is often drama in the big Norfolk skies and it is particularly dramatic when photographed in black and white.

While most of my landscapes are shot in colour, sometimes an image truly lends itself to mono.

Below are two of my prints I’ve picked out to show off this week. Both were shot at Wells-next-the-sea on the north Norfolk coast. The first shows cumulus cloud hovering over East Hills and the second is shot from East Hills looking out toward the old RNLI Lifeboat House (which is currently being replaced with a new one).

The Norfolk coast is wild and dramatic all year round. The expansive beaches and massive skies give you a true sense of freedom. You can lose yourself out there and it is where I go when I want to escape.

These prints mean you can gaze at the view from your home or office space and feel free wherever you are.

Prints in a variety of formats and frame colours/sizes are available via the links below the images. Free UK delivery.

See more of my Norfolk Prints

To get regular updates from this site please subcribe below.

Cumulus over East Hills
View to the Lifeboat House from East Hills
View to the Lifeboat House from East Hills

New Norwich prints at Photo4Me

River Wensum, Norwich prints by Sally Lloyd.

The River Wensum at dusk – canvas

Photo4Me is a print on demand site I use to sell my images. They provide a professional, high quality service with free UK delivery and I have happily been using them for years to sell my work.

Whenever I create a new image at Photo4Me, I will post here to show you what is newly available and show you what the picture could look like in your home or workspace.

If you have any queries or special requirements please feel free to use the contact page to get in touch.

The images are available in a variety of formats including: frames, canvas, acrylic and poster. You can choose from a variety of sizes too.

Here are my latest prints – The River Wensum at Dusk and Elm Hill in April. This image was shot from the Lady Julian Bridge with the Queen of Iceni on the left and the Waterfront on the right.

Choose canvas for that crisp modern look. Ideal for a modern apartment or loft as show above.

Different colour frames are available so you can decide which fits best with your colour scheme.

Visit here for more of my Norfolk prints city, coast and country.

Another newbie is Elm Hill in April. One of the oldest and most picturesque streets in the city of Norwich with its Tudor buildings and cobbles.

See more of my Elm Hill prints by day and by night via the link here.

Elm Hill in April click the link to buy

New prints coming very soon. Please subscribe to keep updated.

Bridges O’er The Wensum – Carrow Bridge

As part of my River Wensum photographic record, I am going to post about each of the bridges along the Wensum, starting here with Carrow Bridge.

Carrow Bridge is a lifting bridge. Unfortunately, I have never been lucky enough to see it lift up. I like to peer into the little control hut and imagine it in operation. Despite my best attempts to find a video of it opening, so far, I haven’t been successful. All I can find is a video of the test opening in 2018 to allow TS Lord Nelson aka HMS Vale pass through, which isn’t particularly interesting!

The current Carrow Bridge was constructed in 1923 to replace the old bridge to the South. More recently, there have been plans by the council to weld the bridge shut. Read a press release from the Norwich Society about this here

Reginald Dann, lived in Carrow Bridge House (the former bridge master’s house) for more than 50 years until it was sold at auction. Thankfully, a plan by the county council to demolish it was defeated by the city council.

You can see images of the bridge open here in an EDP article, when the TS Lord Nelson passed through in 2004. There is also a nice image in the article of the The ship “Paullgate” of Hull carrying cargo under Carrow bridge at the port of Norwich. Dated 20 May 1966. The TS Lord Nelson was eventually decommissioned and now rests in Bristol.

I walk across the bridge at least once every day, and I also cross it every night. I enjoy looking out over both sides of Carrow bridge, but my favourite view is looking back up the river past the Devil’s Tower towards old Paper Mill Yard.

You can read more about the history of the Devil’s Tower here – it is a virtually unique structure in England, built in the early 14th century. Directly opposite is the Windlass Tower.

I will write more about the Wensum Boom Towers in future posts.

A view further up from Carrow Bridge.

Up river towards the old Colman’s factory site.
The Broads Authority River Ranger making checks near Carrow Bridge

Carrow Bridge by night.

I frequently pass under the bridge, on the way into the city. It is a favourite spot for pigeons to court in the spring. There is also the occasional dove.

Sometimes swans sit in the wooden under-structure compartments as if they were stables. I am sure there is a technical name for the structure, but I have no idea what it is.

Carrow Bridge by night.

Eric and Erica, the Egyptian geese, like to perch on the wooden sidings that are there to guide boats through, but usually they are keeping guard on the river bank. Occasionally, a heron perches near the bridge too.

On summer nights, if you are lucky, you may catch a glimpse of bats performing aerobatics around the bridge.

Eric and Erica keeping watch near Carrow Bridge

Street Art under Carrow Bridge

Every now and then, new street art appears under the bridge. These images have disappeared now, which is a shame because I really liked them. They are preferable to the meaningless tagging that crops up everywhere (not meaningless to gangs, I guess, but still an eyesore). 

To see old pictures of Carrow Bridge and the rest of the city, you may enjoy visiting the Francis Frith Collection.

Subscribe to see the next post in my River Wensum photographic record. You could be in with a chance of winning a free notebook via my monthly giveaway if you enter your email in the box below.

Follow me on Instagram @MyriadLifeBooks, @MyriadLifePhotoArt and @PetraKiddWriter

Sources used for this blog post: EDP24, The Norwich Society, the Francis Frith Collection, Norwich.Gov.uk, WivenhoeHistory.org.uk

Spring vibes for photography

Spring is at last beginning to spring into life after what has seemed a very long winter to me.

As a photographer, I love all seasons but I have to say, the long gloomy days this winter just haven’t been as inspiring for me. Although I did carry on shooting (it’s impossible for me to stop), my mojo did wane somewhat.

Every season brings something worth seeing, if it isn’t obvious, you have to go look for it. I live by the river which makes things easier. There are always the swans, geese, cormorants, and pigeons to spot. Never have I been more thankful to see the blossom again, and the wild flowers beginning to burst into life.

I guess the state of the world has to have a bearing on the mood this winter. First came the pandemic and now of course war. Even though we are far removed from the wars in other parts of the world. The thought of others suffering wherever they are, takes a toll on the psyche.

So I am going to cease moaning about what a long difficult winter it was and start to celebrate spring. We are lucky to be here and especially lucky to be living in Norfolk.

This weekend there will be blue sky and the daffodils are blooming all around the city. Yesterday we took a walk along the River Wensum, down past Cow Tower which is one of my favourite spots to see them.

Only a few days earlier, we were lucky enough to spot a Kingfisher along the banks of the Wensum. I spent the whole of 2021 looking out for Kingfishers only to see a few from a very long distance away. This time, I had my baby Canon ready to shoot. I am not really a wildlife photographer, as in, it is not a speciality of mine, so I was mighty chuffed to capture a Kingfisher as they are rare to see and even more difficult to photograph.

I am going to endeavour to keep a photo diary of sorts to blog each week so if you would like to be updated, please hit the subscribe button below. By subscribing you will be in with a chance of winning one of my notebooks. I create a monthly draw and all subscriber emails go into it (not just the new ones).

You can also follow me on Twitter @MyriadLifebooks and as @MyriadPhoto

If Instagram is more your thing, check me out @MyriadLifePhotoArt and @MyriadLifeBooks

Scroll down to see my notebooks and greeting cards to buy. Framed prints are available too. Enjoy!