The Duck Race, Norwich 2022

Images from the Duck Race 2022 held at Lady Julian Bridge on the River Wensum. What a crowd!

Proceeds from the Duck Race were given to a fund for Ukrainian children.

5000 ducks of all colours took part, but didn’t race towards the Millenium Bridge as reported in the Norwich Evening News! They only went a few meters from the bridge in the direction of Foundry Bridge.

It was a fun event and all for a good cause and brilliant to see the crowds out enjoying the spectacle, alongside the Lord Mayor of Norwich.

If you wish to use any of the images shown here please email me via myriadlifebooks@gmail.com

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Jarrold Bridge

Jarrold Bridge, Norwich. A photographic series of the River Wensum.

Canoeing with Thorpe Island Boats under the Jarrold Bridge

My River Wensum series starts with a photo tour of the bridges that cross it. I began with Carrow Bridge as it is the nearest to my apartment. Traveling along the Wensum up towards the city, the next bridge featured in this series is the Novi Sad Friendship Bridge, followed by the Lady Julian Bridge, and from there we arrived at the Foundry Bridge. If you were travelling towards the city by boat, to your left you would see Pull’s Ferry and Norwich Cathedral as you headed towards Bishop Bridge. The next curve is around the bend next to Cow Tower, with the Cathedral to the left, and apartments and offices to the right, where the next bridge is the Jarrold Bridge. 

The Jarrold Bridge

Back from ancient to modern again. Let no one say the Wensum doesn’t provide variety! 

The Jarrold bridge was designed by Stephen James of Ramboll (a company with 50 years of experience in bridge building) and built by local company R G Carter. Visit the Jarrold site to see all the awards this bridge has won and been short listed for. Truly impressive! You will also see other interesting facts there, such as the fact that the bridge slope is less than 1 in 20 for ease of use. It’s certainly nice to cycle over. If you are a bridge enthusiast and would like to know more about the construction of the Jarrold Bridge, SHStructures gives more technical information. I will tell you, however, it is just over 80m in length. I have never seen another bridge like it. I love the modern, clean curve of it and the location is perfect. 

Curve of the Jarrold Bridge over the Wensum
View to the Jarrold Bridge from the Wensum

From the top of the bridge you can enjoy the very natural view up towards Cow Tower and Mousehold Heath, lushly green with willows grazing the water. The bridge is just next to a car park, on the other side of which is the Adam & Eve pub, the oldest watering hole in Norwich. 

The view towards Jarrold Bridge in spring

The city view gives you the rear side of St James Mill, where Jarrold & Sons Ltd have their offices. Next door to St James Mill, new apartments are being built, so it is currently a construction site with a huge crane. I will return to St James Mill and the buildings along the Wensum in future posts. 

St James Mill where Jarrold have their offices.
View to the Jarrold Bridge in spring

The image above shows the ancient flint arch next to the ultra modern Jarrold Bridge.

From modern back to ancient, Whitefriar’s Bridge is the next bridge in this River Wensum series, which will feature not only bridges but go on to study the architecture, wildlife, and the current human life along the river. While the Wensum has a great history, life along the river continues to evolve and change, and I will be documenting that as the series continues.

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Jarrold Bridge O’er the Wensum

Prints of the Jarrold Bridge over the River Wensum in Norwich by Sally Lloyd.

Jarrold Bridge curving over the Wensum in springtime. The ancient flint and brick archway leading to the modern, both surrounded by lush greenery.

Please note the image shown here is low resolution. Please scroll down for more images and information.

A new addition for my River Wensum gallery – the Jarrold Bridge. This bridge is the next to feature in my River Wensum series. If you love Norwich and wish to see and learn more about the Wensum please subscribe below to get regular updates.

I don’t usually sell prints directly from this website, but each print comes with a link directing you to my gallery at Photo4Me who are a trusted supplier (I have used for many years). They can give you a better choice of formats and sizes than I am able to.

At the time of writing this, Photo4Me are giving 20% off all art (until 6th June 2022) and they also give free UK delivery and free UK returns.

This is how the print might look in your home or work space. Choose from a variety of coloured frames: black, oak, white, grey or teak. Prints are available with or without mounts. Or if you prefer the look canvas or acrylic gives, that is available too.

Please visit my Wensum Gallery to see more river prints.

New Norwich prints at Photo4Me

River Wensum, Norwich prints by Sally Lloyd.

The River Wensum at dusk – canvas

Photo4Me is a print on demand site I use to sell my images. They provide a professional, high quality service with free UK delivery and I have happily been using them for years to sell my work.

Whenever I create a new image at Photo4Me, I will post here to show you what is newly available and show you what the picture could look like in your home or workspace.

If you have any queries or special requirements please feel free to use the contact page to get in touch.

The images are available in a variety of formats including: frames, canvas, acrylic and poster. You can choose from a variety of sizes too.

Here are my latest prints – The River Wensum at Dusk and Elm Hill in April. This image was shot from the Lady Julian Bridge with the Queen of Iceni on the left and the Waterfront on the right.

Choose canvas for that crisp modern look. Ideal for a modern apartment or loft as show above.

Different colour frames are available so you can decide which fits best with your colour scheme.

Visit here for more of my Norfolk prints city, coast and country.

Another newbie is Elm Hill in April. One of the oldest and most picturesque streets in the city of Norwich with its Tudor buildings and cobbles.

See more of my Elm Hill prints by day and by night via the link here.

Elm Hill in April click the link to buy

New prints coming very soon. Please subscribe to keep updated.

Foundry Bridge

Images and the history of Foundry Bridge, Norwich.

Foundry Bridge – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

My River Wensum series starts with a photo tour of bridges. I began with Carrow Bridge as it is the nearest to my apartment. Traveling along the Wensum up towards the city, the next bridge featured in this series is the Novi Sad Friendship Bridge, followed by the Lady Julian Bridge and from there we arrive next at Foundry Bridge just by Norwich Train Station.

Norwich Station – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt
View of the Foundry Bridge from the Wensum – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

While I often use Lady Julian Bridge to cut up to King Street for a shorter route into the city, what I really like to do, when I have time, is to walk along the Wensum up to Foundry Bridge and cross over Prince of Wales Road to continue the river walk. I also use Foundry Bridge to cross the river to get to the post office (I am sure you are fascinated to know this). It just goes to show how important these bridges are to daily life in Norwich. I’m very glad I don’t have to swim across the river.

Foundry Bridge at night – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

The Foundry Bridge (a grade II listed building) is a single-span iron bridge with its own distinctive decorative design. Here are some interesting details about the Foundry Bridge from George Plunkett

‘The first to occupy this site was a toll bridge built of wood in 1811 by the contractors, Mendham of Holt. In 1844, with the coming of the railway, it was replaced by one made of iron by Bradley and Co. of Wakefield, and designed by C.D. Atkinson. It cost £800. It was then freed from toll. The present structure was built when Thorpe Station was enlarged; the contractors were R.Tidman and Co of Rosary Rd, Norwich. It cost £12,032. opened on January 17th, 1888.’

It is fascinating to know the cost of the construction of the Foundry Bridge. I can only imagine what a bridge of similar construction would cost today. It certainly wouldn’t be £12,000!

The thing I love about bridges is how unique each one is. Whether it be a footbridge or built for vehicular access, a swing, opening or fixed bridge, they all have their own special design, quirks, and individuality. This really appeals to me. Of course, every bridge provides an interesting viewpoint too, ideal for a photographer. 

Looking back towards Lady Julian Bridge with the Nelson Hotel on the right, Norwich Station on the left, and, of course, the Canoe Man. 

View from Foundry Bridge – Hotel Nelson on right – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

Looking towards the city, Norwich Yacht Station is on the right hand side and the Compleat Angler pub on the left. Willow trees line the river down towards Pulls Ferry and the next bridge in this series Bishopsgate Bridge. 

From Foundry Bridge looking towards Bishop Gate Bridge – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt
Foundry Bridge from on the water – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

While researching the Foundry Bridge, I learned the tragic story of what happened nearby on April 4th, 1817 (Good Friday) to the Norwich Steam Packet when the engine exploded. You can read about it here on the NorfolkTalesMyths.com website.

This terrible story brought to mind a ghostly incident that happened in the Hotel Nelson garden a year ago. We often wander the city streets on summer nights, taking photographs and enjoying the lights. One night, we went down the steps from Foundry Bridge and walked alongside the Nelson Hotel into the garden. I walked a little ahead of my boyfriend while he stopped to read a sign, and suddenly, out of nowhere, a bottle flew through the air and landed by my foot. I spun around expecting to see the person who had thrown it, but there wasn’t a soul to be seen. There were no bushes to hide in.

With no wind and the bottle flying at knee height before it landed, we came to the conclusion it had been thrown by a ghost, or now I wonder, perhaps if it was eerily propelled by the historic explosion…

Whether you believe in ghostly happenings or not, it is the only explanation I have.

Look out for my next blog about Bridges o’er the Wensum – or get updated by hitting the subscribe button below.

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A photographic record of the River Wensum

My next photo blog post will be about Carrow Bridge. It is coming very soon, so look out for it!

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Down by the River Wensum – a photographic record in the making.

Springtime on the River Wensum, Norwich has arrived at last. It feels as though it has been a long winter and although there is always something to see waterside, life gets far more interesting as the temperature rises.

I have spent the last two years photographically recording the River Wensum through the seasons, and I continue to do so. The different styles of architecture, modern and old, are fascinating to shoot. The best thing to do, in my opinion, is to shoot from a boat. My choice of craft is a canoe. It can be a bit wobbly which worries me sometimes but it’s flexible in getting good camera angles. It’s a whole new city from the water!

Where once there were Wherries and ships, now there are leisure boats, paddle boards, canoes and dinghies. Industrial use of the Wensum ceased in the 1980’s. I like to imagine how the Wensum thrived as a port. The industrial buildings all have their own stories. One of my favourite buildings is the old Furniture Restoration barn (see below). The corrugated metal it was created from has worn and rusted over the years. I like the way it is described on the Geograph site as being in a state of ‘picturesque dilapidation’.

The Old Furniture Restoration Barn

There are other elderly buildings I love along the river but I will detail those in future posts.

Each post will focus on a particular aspect of the river whether it be the Cormorants, Barnacle or Egyptian Geese, my beloved swans, Kingfishers or the medieval bridges, historical buildings such as Pull’s Ferry and Norwich Cathedral. I will drop in some history but mostly it will be how I see the river through my eyes, here in 2022, as it continues to change and evolve.

There is so much to look at and investigate, I hope you will subscribe to see the River Wensum through my eyes and enjoy my observations, perhaps even adding your own. The other benefit to subscribing is that every month I create a free notebook giveaway. All you have to do is leave your email address (don’t worry about getting bombarded, I don’t post all that often!)

My next post will give a brief history of the Wensum and explore the bridges.

Til next time…

Follow me on Instagram @MyriadLifeBooks, @MyriadLifePhotoArt and @PetraKiddWriter