Fye Bridge

On a blissful summer’s evening walk along the River Wensum a couple of weeks ago, we came across one of the city’s ghostly storytellers regaling a sizeable group with tales of the women suspected of being witches who were ducked and drowned from Fye Bridge.

Matthew Hopkins, the Witchfinder General, and his colleague in terror, John Stearne, carried out the witch hunts between 1644 and 1647. You can read more about their evil endeavours at CulturaObscura.


The bridge itself looks innocently picturesque in the balmy evening light, but once it held nothing but terror for some of the folk of Norwich, mostly women, but also dishonest tradesmen. 


Fye Bridge is the oldest known bridge site in Norwich. Even older than Bishop Bridge, the bridge was rebuilt in the early 1930’s, so it has a more modern appearance. The bridge site dates back to 1153, a timber structure replaced with stone in the early 15th century. You can see more details and images of the construction of Fye Bridge via George Plunkett.

Personally, I love the shape of Fye bridge, the low curves and contrasting brickwork. It’s nice to sit with a drink at the Ribs of Beef and watch river life glide by.

Fye Bridge shot from a Thorpe Island Canoe

Sometimes you can see Kingfishers doing a spot of fishing. I’ve heard otters are sometimes around, but we have yet to see one.

Fye Bridge Quayside viewpoint


As with many old sites in Norwich, there are stories of a ghost. I will return to ghostly goings on in more detail as this Wensum series progresses, but the likelihood of me ever catching one on camera is extremely remote. If I ever do, the images will appear here first!

From NorfolkLive.co.uk—”Fye Bridge still stands today, and although the days of dunking suspected witches into the river are over, the bridge is said to be home to the ghost of a woman who was tried at the site. She was later burned for witchcraft at the nearby Lollard’s Pit, which is now a local pub. According to those who have had sightings of the ghost, she is dressed in rags and begs strangers to help her pick up a dropped bundle of sticks that were used to kindle the fire that killed her. It’s also believed that those that are kind enough to stop and help her will die in a fire within the year. “

It is always in my nature to help where needed, but I may avoid helping this ghost, I’ve far too many blog posts to get done yet!

Fye Bridge Willows

The name Fye, comes from Magdalen Street which was originally called Fybriggate meaning the street leading to Fye Bridge. (Heritage Norfolk). 

Please visit the sites I have linked for more information. I find the George Plunkett site particularly fascinating because of the old images of the bridges along the Wensum. It is well worth a look.

Under Fye Bridge

If you are interested to learn more of the history of old Norwich, the sites mentioned above give great information. Nick Stone of Invisible Works also makes for a fascinating and in depth read.

If you are new to Norwich I hope you will enjoy learning more about this fine city with its incredible history. If you already have lived here for years, I am sure like me, you are always learning new things about this remarkable place. Hopefully my River Wensum series will spark more interest and you will enjoy my images.

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Please see other posts in the River Wensum Series below. It begins with the bridges, and I will go on to write about the buildings and wildlife (including some of the humans) along the river.

Images of Bridges along the Wensum by MyriadLifePhoto

Please scroll down to find links to the other River Wensum bridges in this series.

Carrow Bridge

Novi Sad Friendship Bridge

Lady Julian Bridge

Foundry Bridge

Bishop Bridge

Jarrold Bridge

Whitefriars Bridge

Wroxham Sailing Club Open Regatta 2022

A collection of images from Wroxham Sailing Club Open Regatta 2022.

Results and more information available via NBYC

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British Powerboat Championship 2022

We had the good fortune to visit the British Powerboat Championship at Oulton Broad on Saturday 23rd July. It was fast, fun and exhilarating to watch. Sadly we couldn’t stay for all of the racing but here are some shots by Sally Lloyd of MyriadLifePhoto.

The event took place at Lowestoft and Oulton Broad Motor Boat Club you can see more information via their site.

Enjoy and if you can, go! It’s a great day out.

If you need an event photographer, please contact me at myriadlifebooks@gmail.com

Norwich Lanes Summer Street Fayre 2022

When a vibrant community comes together, it can achieve anything.
Norwich Lanes Street Fayre 2022.

This is the first time I’ve ever wandered through Norwich Lanes Summer Street Fayre (I am ashamed to say). This week Norwich seemed to burst alive with the Royal Norfolk Show, the Lord Mayor’s Show, the Duck Race and the Lanes Street Fayre. Seeing the crowds: everyone happy and enjoying themselves, was pretty emotional. This feels like the first time Norwich has been able to properly celebrate being free again after all the pandemic woes. It was a show of strength in community and certainly in our business community too.

The Norwich Lanes Street Fayre has been operating for 14 years and is said to attract up to 20k visitors. There seems to be real trend towards shopping with independents again which is heartening to see. Norwich has some mighty fine independent businesses that’s for sure!

Congratulations Norwich and Norfolk! I know some people have their criticisms, always expecting more, but given the fact this fine city and county are still trying to get through the after effects of the pandemic, a cost of living crisis, and what seem like never ending road works, this week proved this fine city, this fine county and all of its fine people are strong and determined to continue to thrive.

Here are some images I shot, next time I will be more prepared and hopefully have more time.

If you would like to use any of the images, please email me at MyriadLifeBooks@gmail.com

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ZingleEye is the name I shoot my street photography under. Please follow @ZingleEye on Instagram to see more. T-shirts etc available via Redbubble with worldwide shipping.

Jarrold Bridge

Jarrold Bridge, Norwich. A photographic series of the River Wensum.

Canoeing with Thorpe Island Boats under the Jarrold Bridge

My River Wensum series starts with a photo tour of the bridges that cross it. I began with Carrow Bridge as it is the nearest to my apartment. Traveling along the Wensum up towards the city, the next bridge featured in this series is the Novi Sad Friendship Bridge, followed by the Lady Julian Bridge, and from there we arrived at the Foundry Bridge. If you were travelling towards the city by boat, to your left you would see Pull’s Ferry and Norwich Cathedral as you headed towards Bishop Bridge. The next curve is around the bend next to Cow Tower, with the Cathedral to the left, and apartments and offices to the right, where the next bridge is the Jarrold Bridge. 

The Jarrold Bridge

Back from ancient to modern again. Let no one say the Wensum doesn’t provide variety! 

The Jarrold bridge was designed by Stephen James of Ramboll (a company with 50 years of experience in bridge building) and built by local company R G Carter. Visit the Jarrold site to see all the awards this bridge has won and been short listed for. Truly impressive! You will also see other interesting facts there, such as the fact that the bridge slope is less than 1 in 20 for ease of use. It’s certainly nice to cycle over. If you are a bridge enthusiast and would like to know more about the construction of the Jarrold Bridge, SHStructures gives more technical information. I will tell you, however, it is just over 80m in length. I have never seen another bridge like it. I love the modern, clean curve of it and the location is perfect. 

Curve of the Jarrold Bridge over the Wensum
View to the Jarrold Bridge from the Wensum

From the top of the bridge you can enjoy the very natural view up towards Cow Tower and Mousehold Heath, lushly green with willows grazing the water. The bridge is just next to a car park, on the other side of which is the Adam & Eve pub, the oldest watering hole in Norwich. 

The view towards Jarrold Bridge in spring

The city view gives you the rear side of St James Mill, where Jarrold & Sons Ltd have their offices. Next door to St James Mill, new apartments are being built, so it is currently a construction site with a huge crane. I will return to St James Mill and the buildings along the Wensum in future posts. 

St James Mill where Jarrold have their offices.
View to the Jarrold Bridge in spring

The image above shows the ancient flint arch next to the ultra modern Jarrold Bridge.

From modern back to ancient, Whitefriar’s Bridge is the next bridge in this River Wensum series, which will feature not only bridges but go on to study the architecture, wildlife, and the current human life along the river. While the Wensum has a great history, life along the river continues to evolve and change, and I will be documenting that as the series continues.

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Drama in the skies!

Black and white images of the north Norfolk coast.

There is often drama in the big Norfolk skies and it is particularly dramatic when photographed in black and white.

While most of my landscapes are shot in colour, sometimes an image truly lends itself to mono.

Below are two of my prints I’ve picked out to show off this week. Both were shot at Wells-next-the-sea on the north Norfolk coast. The first shows cumulus cloud hovering over East Hills and the second is shot from East Hills looking out toward the old RNLI Lifeboat House (which is currently being replaced with a new one).

The Norfolk coast is wild and dramatic all year round. The expansive beaches and massive skies give you a true sense of freedom. You can lose yourself out there and it is where I go when I want to escape.

These prints mean you can gaze at the view from your home or office space and feel free wherever you are.

Prints in a variety of formats and frame colours/sizes are available via the links below the images. Free UK delivery.

See more of my Norfolk Prints

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Cumulus over East Hills
View to the Lifeboat House from East Hills
View to the Lifeboat House from East Hills

Foundry Bridge

Images and the history of Foundry Bridge, Norwich.

Foundry Bridge – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

My River Wensum series starts with a photo tour of bridges. I began with Carrow Bridge as it is the nearest to my apartment. Traveling along the Wensum up towards the city, the next bridge featured in this series is the Novi Sad Friendship Bridge, followed by the Lady Julian Bridge and from there we arrive next at Foundry Bridge just by Norwich Train Station.

Norwich Station – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt
View of the Foundry Bridge from the Wensum – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

While I often use Lady Julian Bridge to cut up to King Street for a shorter route into the city, what I really like to do, when I have time, is to walk along the Wensum up to Foundry Bridge and cross over Prince of Wales Road to continue the river walk. I also use Foundry Bridge to cross the river to get to the post office (I am sure you are fascinated to know this). It just goes to show how important these bridges are to daily life in Norwich. I’m very glad I don’t have to swim across the river.

Foundry Bridge at night – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

The Foundry Bridge (a grade II listed building) is a single-span iron bridge with its own distinctive decorative design. Here are some interesting details about the Foundry Bridge from George Plunkett

‘The first to occupy this site was a toll bridge built of wood in 1811 by the contractors, Mendham of Holt. In 1844, with the coming of the railway, it was replaced by one made of iron by Bradley and Co. of Wakefield, and designed by C.D. Atkinson. It cost £800. It was then freed from toll. The present structure was built when Thorpe Station was enlarged; the contractors were R.Tidman and Co of Rosary Rd, Norwich. It cost £12,032. opened on January 17th, 1888.’

It is fascinating to know the cost of the construction of the Foundry Bridge. I can only imagine what a bridge of similar construction would cost today. It certainly wouldn’t be £12,000!

The thing I love about bridges is how unique each one is. Whether it be a footbridge or built for vehicular access, a swing, opening or fixed bridge, they all have their own special design, quirks, and individuality. This really appeals to me. Of course, every bridge provides an interesting viewpoint too, ideal for a photographer. 

Looking back towards Lady Julian Bridge with the Nelson Hotel on the right, Norwich Station on the left, and, of course, the Canoe Man. 

View from Foundry Bridge – Hotel Nelson on right – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

Looking towards the city, Norwich Yacht Station is on the right hand side and the Compleat Angler pub on the left. Willow trees line the river down towards Pulls Ferry and the next bridge in this series Bishopsgate Bridge. 

From Foundry Bridge looking towards Bishop Gate Bridge – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt
Foundry Bridge from on the water – image by @MyriadLifePhotoArt

While researching the Foundry Bridge, I learned the tragic story of what happened nearby on April 4th, 1817 (Good Friday) to the Norwich Steam Packet when the engine exploded. You can read about it here on the NorfolkTalesMyths.com website.

This terrible story brought to mind a ghostly incident that happened in the Hotel Nelson garden a year ago. We often wander the city streets on summer nights, taking photographs and enjoying the lights. One night, we went down the steps from Foundry Bridge and walked alongside the Nelson Hotel into the garden. I walked a little ahead of my boyfriend while he stopped to read a sign, and suddenly, out of nowhere, a bottle flew through the air and landed by my foot. I spun around expecting to see the person who had thrown it, but there wasn’t a soul to be seen. There were no bushes to hide in.

With no wind and the bottle flying at knee height before it landed, we came to the conclusion it had been thrown by a ghost, or now I wonder, perhaps if it was eerily propelled by the historic explosion…

Whether you believe in ghostly happenings or not, it is the only explanation I have.

Look out for my next blog about Bridges o’er the Wensum – or get updated by hitting the subscribe button below.

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